Who We Are

It’s helpful to pause amidst the busyness of life to reflect on who we are in Christ Jesus. These thoughts from Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones serve as a helpful “tap on the shoulder” to remind us of this glorious life that we as believers have been called to.

“What is a Christian? Paul tells the Colossians that a Christian is a man who has been translated from the kingdom of darkness into the kingdom of God’s dear Son.

I no longer belong to the world. I belong to the kingdom of Christ, the kingdom of light, the kingdom of glory, the kingdom of God.

Here I am and the world has nothing to do with me. I am not of it. I am in this other kingdom.

Oh, I am still existing in this world, but I no longer belong to it. I have been translated. And my citizenship is now in heaven, from whence also we look for the Savior, and we know that we shall ever go on and be with the Lord.

He, by dying on the cross, separates me from the world, puts me into His own kingdom, introduces me to God, and makes me a child of God, and an heir of eternal bliss.”

~Martyn Lloyd-Jones, The Cross: God’s Way of Salvation


“He has delivered us  from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of His beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.”

~Colossians 1:13-14 (ESV)

The Blessed Walk of Faith

“We walk by faith, not by sight.”

~2 Corinthians 5:7 (ESV)

This walk of faith takes in all the minute circumstances of every day’s history; a walking every step by faith; a looking above trials, above necessities, above perplexities, above improbabilities and impossibilities, above second causes; and, in the face of difficulties and discouragements, going forward, leaning upon God.

If the Lord were to roll the Red Sea before us, and marshal the Egyptians behind us, and thus, hemming us in on every side, should yet bid us advance, it would be the duty and privilege of faith instantly to obey, believing that, before our feet touched the waters, God, in our extremity, would divide the sea, and take us dry-shod over it.

This is the only holy and happy life of a believer; if he for a moment leaves this path, and attempts to walk by sight, difficulties will throng around him, troubles will multiply, the smallest trials will become heavy crosses, temptations to depart from the simple and upright walk will increase in number and power, the heart will sicken at disappointment, the Spirit will be grieved, and God will be dishonored.

Let this precious truth ever be before our mind: Walk by faith, not by sight.

~Octavius Winslow, Personal Declension and Revival of Religion in the Soul

Settle This Truth

“Reader, your calling is to dedicate yourself – your soul – your body – all that you are – all that you have – all that you can do – a sacrifice to God.

You may not keep anything from Him, who has given more than all heaven for your ransom. Settle this truth, then, steadily in your mind; that there is no acceptance for person, or services, except in the Beloved.

Words and works are worse than worthless, except when offered in faith, and through the merits, and for the sake of Jesus. That fruit is only rottenness, which is not sanctified by His blood, and consecrated to His glory.

Cement yourself, your every intent, – your every doing to Him.”

~Henry Law, Christ is All


“I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.”

~Philippians 3:14 (ESV)

In the Fires

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” ‘Glorify ye the Lord in the fires’ Isaiah 24:15 (ESV), not when they have passed or you are out of them and they are only memories, but in them.”

~Amy Carmichael, 1867-1951

When we’re going through trials, we cannot be so focused on the “fire” that we neglect that greater Light. It’s important that we stay in God’s word – remembering that the encouragement that threads through the Bible was put there for strugglers like us.

“Some, though dead to the world, have not that joy in God which it is their privilege to possess. They meditate too much upon their own infirmities, and too little upon the perfections and promises of their God.

O brethren, look at God as the God of salvation, as the God of your salvation, and you shall have your fears turned into confidence, and your sorrows into thanksgiving and the voice of melody.”

~Charles Simeon from his sermon titled “The Christian’s Boast” from Habakkuk 3:17-18. Read the entire message here.


“Though the fig tree should not blossom, nor fruit be on the vines, the produce of the olive fail and the fields yield no food, the flock be cut off from the fold and there be no herd in the stalls, yet I will rejoice in the LORD; I will take joy in the God of my salvation.

God, the Lord, is my strength; He makes my feet like the deer’s; He makes me tread on my high places.”

~Habakkuk 3:17-18 (ESV)

Eliza Spurgeon

Eliza Spurgeon’s prayer life made a strong impression on her son, Charles, and her husband, John.

It’s encouraging to read about and see first hand the heart of godly moms for their children – and their God.

“Never could it be possible for any man to estimate what he owes a godly mother.

Certainly I have not the powers of speech to set forth my valuation of the choice blessing which the Lord bestowed on me in making me the son of one who prayed for me, and prayed with me.

How can I ever forget her tearful eye when she warned me to escape from the wrath to come?

How can I ever forget when she bowed her knee, and with her arms about my neck, prayed, ‘Oh, that my son might live before Thee!’ ”

~Charles Spurgeon, 1834-1892

“As I came home one evening and went upstairs, I heard the voice of his mother pleading for her boy Charles, and talking to him and the others, and pouring her heart out in prayer in such a way as I never did in my life, and as I never heard before.

It is for the encouragement  of mothers that I mention this, that you may pray for your children, for God is a prayer-hearing God, and a prayer-answering God.”

~John Spurgeon, 1811-1902


I stumbled across those thoughts on a website called The Bible Truth Chat Room. I don’t know enough about the site to recommend it. I was just encouraged by what I read there from the Spurgeons.

The Next Step

 

It’s not too difficult to find time to read God’s Word, but to go a step further and thoroughly think through what we’ve read is another story altogether.

Maybe we’re just too busy.

Yet, I hear the wisdom of an old friend who said that people usually find time to do the things that they really want to do.

May God give us a desire to take that next step and meditate on what God has revealed to us in the Bible.

In J.I. Packer’s classic, Knowing God, his definition of “meditation” serves as a enticing explanation of what it means to ponder the things of God.

“Meditation is the activity of calling to mind, and thinking over, and dwelling on, and applying to oneself, the various things that one knows about the works and ways and purposes and promises of God. It is an activity of holy thought, consciously performed in the presence of God, under the eye of God, by the help of God, as a means of communion with God.

Its purpose is to clear one’s mental and spiritual vision of God, and to let His truth make its full and proper impact on one’s mind and heart. It is a matter of talking to oneself about God and oneself; it is, indeed, often a matter of arguing with oneself, reasoning oneself out of moods of doubt and unbelief into a clear apprehension of God’s power and grace.

Its effect is ever to humble us, as we contemplate God’s greatness and glory and our own littleness and sinfulness, and to encourage and reassure us – ‘comfort’ us, in the old, strong, Bible sense of the word – as we contemplate the unsearchable riches of divine mercy displayed in the Lord Jesus Christ.”

~J.I. Packer, Knowing God


“And she [Martha] had a sister called Mary, who sat at the the Lord’s feet and listened to His teaching. But Martha was distracted with much serving.”

~Luke 10:39-40 (ESV)

A 16th Century Post-it Note

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I don’t have the best of memories, but thankfully, I do have Post-it Notes. I have one on my computer at work right now to remind me that there’s an important recording at 1:30 Monday afternoon. Or is it 2:30?

The fact is we all need reminders. And that holds true for spiritual matters as well. These truths from an ancient catechism prompted me to recall some very important truths that serve to warm a Christian’s heart. I’m hopeful that will be your experience.

Question 1.
What is thy only comfort in life and death?

Answer.
That I with body and soul,
both in life and death,
am not my own,
but belong unto my faithful Saviour Jesus Christ;
who, with his precious blood,
has fully satisfied for all my sins,
and delivered me from all the power of the devil;
and so preserves me
that without the will of my heavenly Father,
not a hair can fall from my head;
yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation,
and therefore, by His Holy Spirit,
He also assures me of eternal life,
and makes me sincerely willing and ready,
henceforth, to live unto Him.

~The Heidelberg Catechism, 1563


“Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.”

~Philippians 4:8 (ESV)